Hackathon IV: Notes 2.0 and Beyond… A New Evolution Has Begun

Vishu Viswanathan

Vishu Viswanathan

Director of Software Engineering at SRS Health
Vishu started his career with SRS Health as the Director of Program Management, and is now the Director of Software Engineering. In this role, he is responsible for the architecture, design, and development operations for the SRS product lines.

Prior to joining SRS in 2017, Vishu was with GE Healthcare, where he was the SW Engineering Director for the Centricity Imaging PACS product. Vishu has had a successful career in the healthcare industry, with deep domain expertise in Healthcare imaging, devices and information technology, and medical software development. He began his career as a Software Engineer with GE Healthcare and has held progressively responsible roles in both product development and program management.

Vishu is an Agile practitioner and is passionate about people and product development. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science and Engineering, and Masters in Business Administration.
Vishu Viswanathan

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Hackathon 1Last month, SRS Health participated in an energizing, collaborative and fun-filled Hackathon IV, a company-wide event designed to stimulate the innovative mind-set and competitive spirit of the organization to explore creative solutions for client needs.

The theme for the 4th Annual Hackathon Event was, Notes 2.0 and Beyond. Technological advancements in the healthcare space has enabled the use of various mobile devices and technologies at the point-of-care. The team was challenged to come up with ideas that revolutionize the process of capturing and documenting patient encounters, while maintaining/improving accuracy, high productivity, and efficiency for the end user.

Scores of ideas were submitted from across the organization and narrowed down to six ideas that our hackathon teams focused on. At the end of the event, the organization held a traditional “science fair” to showcase the incredibly innovative solutions developed over the one-week event.

We are excited that a number of these concepts have the potential to make it into future versions of our products. We look forward to sharing them with our clients in the 2018 User Summit’s Innovation Expo in October in Las Vegas.

At SRS Health, we strive to bring innovative healthcare IT solutions to the marketplace and our hackathon events allow the team to innovate without restraints.

Hackathon 2

Spring at SRS Brings New Growth

Khal Rai

Khal Rai

CEO at SRS Health
Khal Rai brings over 20 years of leadership experience to his role as President and CEO at SRS. He possesses a breadth of knowledge and expertise in the healthcare and technology sectors earned through a career that has spanned the globe. His passion for collaboration, strategic development, and delivering healthcare IT solutions that make it easier for medical professionals to deliver care while navigating the ever-changing healthcare industry, inspires and motivates his team, while positioning SRS Health clients for current and future success. Khal has a B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University.
Khal Rai

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ceo-spring-blogThree months have passed since I took over the reins at SRS Health, and what I have enjoyed most over that time is sharing in our clients’ successes, as well as learning about the challenges they face, their experiences, and their visions for the future. So far this year, I have had the pleasure of speaking with many of them on the phone and off traveling around the country to meet others in their practices or at conferences like ADAM, AAOS, AAOE, The OrthoForum, and HIMSS.

One recurring theme that has been a part of every conversation is the need to embrace change—to look forward, to anticipate, and to strive for improvement. Our mission is to help our clients do just that. We are excited to share the innovations SRS has been working on to help our clients excel at the practice and the business of medicine. Here are a few examples:

SRS Health launches the first end-to-end integrated clinical and financial solution suite for high-performance enterprise practices

I am pleased to announce that SRS recently debuted a unique and powerful new addition to our end-to-end software suite that leverages both clinical and financial expertise. What makes this solution unique is the integration that addresses true episodic care. SRS’ roots in the orthopaedic market combined with the new financial management capabilities offers a seamless set of tools for enhancing workflows, adapting to regulatory changes, adopting risk-based models, managing the increase in patient economic responsibility, and expanding programs in the employer market.

The Opioid Crisis and Drug Monitoring

As you know, the opioid crisis has become a top-of-mind political, social, and policy challenge. SRS has committed to joining the fight by being the first specialty EHR to offer PDMP (Prescription Drug Monitoring Program) checking and documentation integrated within the prescribing workflow—delivering a 67% time savings over current methods. More than 40 states already have PDMP mandates and it won’t be long before they all do. This is a great step in keeping our clients ahead of the curve.

Improving Our Clients’ Experience

While working on innovation, we haven’t forgotten about our clients’ day-to-day experience. To ensure their success, we have been formalizing the structure of the SRS Client Success Program. This year we’ve launched the Client Success Training Program and the Features Improvement Team. In addition, we have increased our clients’ ability to integrate with registries, HIEs, and more. These programs ensure that they have the knowledge and skills to fully leverage their HCIT solutions, the facility to share knowledge across their organization, and the connections to exchange information with optimal efficiency.

Medicine continues to put more and more demands on physicians, clinicians, and other healthcare professionals, and we’re excited that our integrated solutions suite optimizes performance and care before, during, and after the patient encounter. Our goal is to help our clients by taking care of the business of medicine, so they can focus on what matters most—their patients.

I Want My…I Want My VBC

Scott Ciccarelli

Scott Ciccarelli

CEO at SRS Health
Scott Ciccarelli, Chief Executive Officer at SRS, has more than 20 years of diverse management and operations experience garnered as a senior executive at GE, where he headed two of the company’s businesses—most recently, GE Healthcare’s Services, Ambulatory and Revenue Cycle Solutions. His areas of expertise include business strategy, leadership development, operational rigor (Lean Six Sigma), and the delivery of enhanced value for customers through quality improvement and innovation.
Scott Ciccarelli

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I-want-my-vbc-blog

Launched with the iconic “I Want My MTV” ad campaign, Music Television was born in 1981 – and the music industry changed forever. For the first time, we could do more than hear music; we could see it being executed in a new visual medium. And the most successful bands were the ones who took advantage of this new opportunity to engage with audiences. Fast-forward to today, and technology has helped our music consumption continue to evolve in ways we could never have imagined.

So why am I talking about the 80s, what does this have to do with our annual User Summit, and how does Value Based Care (VBC) fit into all of this? Yes, we had an awesome 80s-themed party at last month’s summit. (I may or may not have been dressed as Slash, the guitarist from Guns N’ Roses at one point…) But there’s a better reason: we are in the midst of a healthcare revolution – and we are all making history. Together.

“Together” is a key word to tomorrow’s value based success. It’s how SRS Health is going to help our clients prepare for VBC, so they can benefit financially from the data-driven rewards – and more importantly, so they can utilize that data to provide even better medical care. We are continuing the SRS tradition of collaborating with our clients to create agile solutions designed to maximize today’s opportunities and pave the way for value-based success.

How are we doing this? With intelligent data solutions that cultivate the high levels of patient engagement, operational efficiency, and demonstration of quality that are critical to VBC. Working toward improved outcomes benefits your patients, and it benefits your businesses.

Here’s how some of our amazing clients are adding their ingenuity to our flexible data solutions, to provide improved care at lower cost – and create rock star VBC results:

  • Informed Decision Making. Bayview Physicians Group, a multi-specialty practice in Chesapeake, VA, is using data-driven evidence to mitigate the potential reimbursement shortfalls in the Medicare Advantage HCC Program. By developing protocols for various high-risk categories that help justify higher-cost treatments, Bayview is positioning themselves to be ahead of the cost factor curve. Why? Because the data shows that they are only recommending higher-cost treatments when they are medically necessary, which ultimately justifies the expense.
  • Operational Efficiency. Illinois Bone & Joint Institute has been using data to standardize best care practices across all of their physicians to provide the best and most effective results – in both the Medicare Federal Programs and commercial markets. For the past year, they’ve been investigating the factors that most influence orthopaedic outcomes, and how to use outcomes data to drive better care at lower cost. Now they want to combine the power of their EHR and their Outcomes solution to provide real-time evidence-based information at the point of care – and OBERD is on board to help us turn this vision into a real VBC-inspired game changer for them and for the industry.
  • Driving Growth. In South Carolina, Charleston Ear, Nose, and Throat & Allergy is maintaining their competitive edge in a different way. They’re leveraging their center of excellences operational process, IT capabilities and professional organization to expand by offering other practices access to the experience, tools, and solutions required for VBC success. This has led to a group of practices that can negotiate cost savings, better reimbursements and referrals – and it’s helping to create a sort of registry that will provide better data to help inform ENT physicians and improve outcomes in the new healthcare economy.

While VBC may not have the same cache as MTV, it really is something to get excited about. We are on the cusp of an entirely new way of providing healthcare – and with our intelligent data solutions and your innovative medical expertise, we’ve got what it takes to top the charts.

Change is always scary, but it also brings opportunities. And we’re ready to start singing “I want my VBC!” (80s attire optional.)

Is Healthcare Hi-Tech Enough?

Barbara Mullarky

Barbara Mullarky

Director, Product Management at SRS Health
Barbara has had a successful career in the healthcare industry, working for both vendors and healthcare provider organizations. She has held roles in sales, marketing, product management and professional services, working with EMR and department-focused solutions for the laboratory and imaging.

Prior to becoming the Director of Product Management at SRS, Barbara was with GE Healthcare (now GE Digital), where she held the positions of Senior Product Marketing Manager for Centricity imaging products, Product Marketing Manager and Customer Collaboration Leader for what is now Caradigm, and Upstream Marketing Manager for Centricity Laboratory. Barbara also worked at the University of Arizona Medical Center, where she managed a team that was responsible for implementing and maintaining 27 departmental IT solutions, the ambulatory EMR and the patient safety initiatives.

Originally from New Jersey, Barbara now lives with her husband in Tucson, AZ. She is a graduate of the West Virginia University College of Medicine and is a registered Medical Technologist. When not at work, she loves traveling, taking photographs, watching football and spending time with her two Brittanys.
Barbara Mullarky

315x236-Devices-med-iconsThe answer to that question depends on what part of the healthcare continuum you look at. When it comes to the actual treatment of disease, few fields can compare with medicine in terms of developing and incorporating new technology. Think of cyber knives, genetically guided cancer therapies, complex new drugs for autoimmune diseases, and the way that surgery has become increasingly less invasive through its reliance on computer imaging and magnification for micro-, laparoscopic, and robot assisted surgery.

On the other hand, when it comes to the use of information technology, healthcare hasn’t been nearly as forward looking as, say, banking, or travel, or even the food industry. How often have you visited a highly respected doctor, located in state-of-the-art facilities, and had to spend half an hour filling out pages of badly xeroxed forms, asking redundant and often irrelevant questions about your personal health history? How often has a member of your doctor’s staff had to spend the time to call you to remind you of an appointment? How often have you wasted time trying to reach your doctor by phone to ask a simple question about your treatment?

Fortunately, the landscape is changing. The industry is starting to engage patients in new ways, using text messaging, video conferencing, and wearable devices to keep patients actively in the therapeutic loop rather than simply at the passive, receiving end. And it’s about time.

According to Pew research:

  • 88% of Americans use the Internet
  • 73% have broadband service at home
  • 95% of us carry a cell phone of some type
  • 62% of those have used their phone in the past year to look up information about a health condition.

Those numbers don’t surprise me. As I write this, I am sitting in O’Hare Airport and almost everyone in the departure lounge has a smart phone in his or her hand. Urban legend has it that people under 55 like to text while people over 60 prefer to make phone calls, but if O’Hare is any indication, the over-60 crowd is just as tech savvy as the younger generation. They’re checking the airline app—this happens to be a really bad travel day fraught with weather delays—so that they can text their families and friends with updates. In 2013, Exerpian Marketing found that adults over 55 send almost 500 text messages a month. I’m sure that number is much higher today.

So why not take advantage of this in your practice? Phones and texting allow you to engage with your patients in a whole new way. You can text them appointment reminders (my hair dresser has been doing it for years), let them know if your office is closed due to inclement weather, or notify them that it’s time to make an appointment to have their eyes checked.

Mobile devices can also be used as an electronic physician’s assistant, with apps to guide care and improve outcomes. Imagine if patients could log onto an app on their phones that reminded them of exercises they had to do that day, showed a video of how to do those exercises, recorded that the exercises had been done as well as the patient pain level and other progress indicators . . . and then automatically transmitted all of this information to the physician to become part of their charts. And that all this happened without the time and expense of the doctor’s staff having to make personal calls.

Even better, imagine that you, as the patient, could see your doctor without leaving your home or office. While video technology has been around for a long time, traditional physician practices have been slow to adopt teleservices. This is partly because state regulations and reimbursement policies have not encouraged it, outside of the few online physician services offering quick and relatively easy consults on a “pay now for service” basis. However, more and more states are passing legislation that allow doctors to establish provider-patient relationships through face-to-face interactive, two-way, real-time communication, or through store-and-forward technologies. In addition, some of the laws call out payment policies, and require that care provided via teleservices be billed the same as an in-office visit. I’d personally love it if my doctor adopted teleservices—it would save me the 30-minute drive to her office, the 10 minutes spent parking, the 20-minute delay because she is usually running late, and the 30-minute drive home. Instead, her office could text me when she’s ready and we could engage for 15 minutes via a telemedicine system. A lot better than the minimum 90+ minutes to do an in-person visit.

The final frontier is when healthcare manages to combine information technology with its existing drive for advanced treatment technology. One university research team is developing a tracking device that could be embedded in a pill; the device would activate when the patient took the medication, sending a message to a receiver app, which in turn would create a record for family members or physicians to review. This may initially sound a little too invasive, but think of the boon for families caring for an elder relative—they could verify that the correct meds were taken without having to hire an on-site care-giver or to make daily trips to ensure compliance.

What’s common to all these new technologies is that they recognize that the patient is at the center of the care team, and the information the patient provides must be incorporated into the therapeutic process in real time. The sooner we engage patients in their own care, the better outcomes we will all experience—and the technology that we are already using every day can help us get there. Is the healthcare you are providing hi-tech enough? What technology are you using now to advance your patient engagement?

Will Robots Replace Healthcare Providers?

Khal Rai

Khal Rai

CEO at SRS Health
Khal Rai brings over 20 years of leadership experience to his role as President and CEO at SRS. He possesses a breadth of knowledge and expertise in the healthcare and technology sectors earned through a career that has spanned the globe. His passion for collaboration, strategic development, and delivering healthcare IT solutions that make it easier for medical professionals to deliver care while navigating the ever-changing healthcare industry, inspires and motivates his team, while positioning SRS Health clients for current and future success. Khal has a B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University.
Khal Rai

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robot-blogLeveraging interpretive intelligence in clinical workflows

Automation has been making human workers superfluous for centuries, but until recently, workers whose jobs required high-level cognitive skills have been able to rest easy, confident no machine could possibly replace them when it came to making nuanced decisions based on the evaluation of complicated, sometimes contradictory data.

But that was before Artificial Intelligence (AI) came along, stepping out of the pages of science fiction and into our daily lives. It now seems possible — even probable — machines will replace many mid-level knowledge workers and the question arises whether someday robots will replace doctors and nurses.

It’s a provocative question, certainly, but not the most interesting one facing our industry. A more critical question is will the healthcare ecosystem — the vendors and the solution providers — be able to survive without AI? I ask this because I believe doctors and healthcare administrators will increasingly demand answers to questions, and solutions to the challenges, that are difficult, if not impossible, to solve without the aid of AI-driven solutions.

These questions will range from practical issues of practice management to vital questions of patients’ health. For example:

  • How much will it cost to treat this patient?
  • How much and how fast will I get paid?
  • Is medication or surgery the best treatment option for this particular patient?
  • Where and/or when should I schedule this surgery?
  • When will this patient be able to return to his/her normal routine?

Some of these, of course, are the perennial questions that have always faced healthcare practitioners, but the truth is recent changes in technology have made innovative solutions possible in a way never before imaginable. For example, all kinds of data are now readily available in consumable (discrete) forms — from PHI to financials to protocols — and storing and managing this data is getting cheaper every day.

Additionally, healthcare providers are beginning to understand the shift from service to value-based care and are seeing how it can work for them, both clinically and financially. Finally, the healthcare practitioners themselves are changing: computer- and technology-savvy clinicians who got their medical education and training in the 1990s and early 2000s (the so-called Generation X and Y) are now entering into leadership positions where they can affect change.

In other words, there is both a greater supply of data than ever before and a greater demand for it. However, this demand isn’t simply for large data-dumps of undigested information. What’s necessary is for healthcare providers and administrators to have the critical data they need, and only the data they need, when and where and in the form they need it. This is where AI can help make critical decisions about amalgamating and filtering data.

There’s enormous potential for AI (or “smart solutions”) to optimize clinical protocols by drawing on a huge pool of evidence-based results. As we move toward a value-based environment, AI will be increasingly necessary to proactively and dynamically manage patient outcomes. This, in turn, will optimize the treatment experience, leading to greater patient engagement — and this greater continuity of care will promote both healthier patients and healthier practices. Clinicians will also gain insights into how to manage risks, which leads to lower costs and better margins.

Will robots replace healthcare providers? It seems unlikely, but care teams will start to leverage interpretive intelligence in daily clinical workflow. Machine learning, along with AI, will become an integral part of the healthcare mix because the vast resources of critical data will only be truly available when clinicians have tools to track real-time data embedded in their daily workflows resulting in better patient care at a lower cost.

As seen in Health IT Outcomes.

Reimagining a Stable Future

Lester Parada

Lester Parada

Vice President of Operations at SRS Health
As the Vice President of Operations, Lester brings over 10 years of increased management experience in operations and product management to the team having held roles in Product Management, Business Development, and Project Management. Lester often visits clients to ensure their SRS Health experience is positive and that they are optimizing their solutions to meet the needs of their practice. Lester frequently attends conferences and tradeshows where he shares his vast product and industry knowledge to educate, while learning from clients and attendees as well.

Lester earned a BS Finance and Management from Montclair State University and an MBA in Marketing Management from Rutgers. In addition, he is a certified PMP (Project Management Professional), CSM (Certified Scrum Master) and CSPO (Certified Scrum Product Owner).
Lester Parada

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stable-future-blog-v2HHS Secretary Tom Price, an orthopaedic surgeon, stated weeks ago that he wants to “reimagine” the federal department. I would humbly suggest—and hope—that one of the items he “reimagines” is the process by which policy is implemented as it relates healthcare technology.

Since 2011, the healthcare IT (HCIT) sector has been severely hampered by policy uncertainty. Each year, new guidelines and certification criteria are presented. These usually receive some negative reactions from healthcare providers, and then amended as the timelines extend or change. Many times, the policies have been changed a mere two months before their scheduled start date. For providers, the noise around these policy changes creates an environment in which uncertainty avoidance becomes a priority. That means retiring early, merging with a hospital or a larger group to share risks, putting off expansion plans and capital expenditures, and other strategies. For HCIT companies, it means not funding innovation and being forced to focusing on more and more functionality that customers do not value.

In macroeconomics the term “C bar” refers to “the autonomous real consumption expenditures by consumers but as it relates to their confidence.” In layman’s terms, it is the current outlook that consumers have towards the economy and their own financial situation. It reflects their level of confidence or lack thereof. A good level of confidence increases consumers’ likelihood to spend and borrow (otherwise known as their marginal propensity to consume). A poor level signals economic contraction is ahead. It is affected by many factors in our complex economy like housing prices, unemployment, and inflation. However, nothing affects confidence more than uncertainty! In general, when consumers sense they are not reasonably confident of what the future outcome of something will be, they pull back from the table and wait.

You can see evidence of this exact macroeconomic principle in healthcare today. I would venture a guess that if we tracked healthcare’s C bar, we would see that we are in negative territory and likely have been for years.

What we need is stability and a clear direction forward: setting policy and requirements early, providing sufficient time to implement changes, and then not surprising the industry with last-minute changes or corrections. Once confidence is restored, I believe that both providers and HCIT companies will experience a mini boom as all of the delayed investments and innovations work their way back into the sector.

 

If You Build It, Will They Come?

Luis Marcos

Luis Marcos

Senior Operations Manager at SRS Health
Luis began his tenure with SRS-Health nearly 8 years ago as an Implementation Specialist. In that time, his attention to detail and planning garnered accolades from clients and colleagues alike, making him a star within the department. In 2015, he shifted his attention to organizational project management with an emphasis on operational efficiency while overseeing activities in Professional Services. His focus shifted in mid-2016 and he now oversees the activities of both the Support and Service Delivery Teams.
Luis Marcos

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Let’s take a moment and talk about the ideal development-to-adoption scenario. For the sake of the exercise, you’re Kevin Costner. You hear a whisper about building it. You continue to explore what it is until you realize that you have been asked to build a baseball field. Through hard work and perseverance, the request becomes reality. In no time at all, ghost baseball players emerge from behind corn stalks and play a game.

That right there folks, is the dream of every software developer. They aspire to build what you need and then have you faithfully use their creation. Alas, like Field of Dreams (beautiful film), that aspiration typically falls under the genre of fantasy.

How can that be? Why wouldn’t a user take advantage of an enhancement to their software? Truth be told, there are number of reasons as to why, including, but not limited to:

  1. Lack of awareness.
  2. Aversion to change.
  3. The functionality doesn’t meet your exact needs.
  4. The perceived effort of deploying the change outweighs the benefit.

As an end user, you should want and need to maximize the feature set that your software has to offer. Why is this so important? In the graphic below, I have listed only a few of the ways that software enhancements can impact the bottom-line.

improved-bottom-line-700px

As I challenge myself to seamlessly interject concepts from other cherished feature films, this is where I say, “Help me, help you!” When it comes to your software, aspire to A.C.E. the experience.

Accountability: Appoint an Internal Software Administrator (ISA). This person would be responsible for forging a relationship with your software vendor(s). They need to be familiar with the vendor’s release cycle and understand what each new version has to offer. They would then be responsible for scheduling recurring meetings with key stakeholders to discuss their findings and recommendations. They should also volunteer to participate in any focus groups that your vendor may offer. This is a great way to ensure that your vendor understands the specific needs of your organization and how they fit into the big picture.

Collaboration:  Who are these “key stakeholders” that I mentioned above? They would be your Change Control Board (CCB). This group should be comprised of members of each functional department of your business, as changes may have ripple effects throughout the organization. Affecting change is often easier when the decision is made jointly as initial buy-in will be stronger.

Execute: Assuming the CCB finds value in certain enhancements, develop a plan to implement them. This will often involve initial training, shadowing and follow-up that could span a few weeks. Remember that each implemented change is a deviation to someone’s routine. Depending on the work flow adjustment required, a fair degree of staff coaching may be involved.

In fairness, I realize that I’m making all of this sound really easy. It’s work and it requires commitment. Alas, if it means that you can add to your bottom-line, become more efficient or play a round of catch with “Shoeless” Joe Jackson, it is worth exploring.

Now go A.C.E. your experience!