You Say You Want a Revolution…

Ryan Newsome

Ryan Newsome

Vice President of Product Development at SRS Health
Ryan Newsome is the Vice President of Product Development. In this role he is responsible for the Product Development, Engineering, Quality, Development Operations, and Program Management teams.

Ryan began his career as a Software Engineer for Pitney Bowes/Map Info building early location-aware web services and solutions. Since joining the SRS Health team in 2005, Ryan has held multiple engineering, architecture and management roles in the Product Development organization. Over his 12-year tenure with SRS, Ryan has helped lead the Development organization through a number of growth cycles and evolutions, most recently being the organization’s transition to Agile development. He is passionate about building strategies and solutions that have a big impact on the lives of the specialists we serve, as well as their patients, and believes this is achieved through a commitment to collaboration among clients, strategic partners, and the SRS team. He regularly attends industry trade shows, conferences, and commercial engagements where he represents the company’s product vision and strategy. Ryan received a Bachelor of Science in Computer Sciences from Sienna College.
Ryan Newsome

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This past February, SRS Health sponsored its third annual hackathon. Hackathons are the proving grounds for new ideas. These events stimulate creativity and encourage risk-taking to develop innovative solutions to new or persistent problems.Hackathon Blog ImageThis year’s hackathon was organized around the theme of Data Revolution, and when you think about it, there’s a revolutionary quality to the very idea of hackathons. The word “hackathon” is a portmanteau of the words “hack” and “marathon,” where “hack” is used in the sense of exploratory programming. It’s this exploratory aspect of hackathons that enables participants to be super creative, push boundaries, think outside-of-the-box and develop revolutionary ideas. We solicit ideas from customers and SRSers that can range from practical enhancements to futuristic solutions for tomorrow’s problems.

At SRS Health, we’ve noticed some strong benefits to running hackathons:

  • Feedback – If our product is going to help solve your problems, we need to know what those problems are. Hackathons allow us to discover problems and explore solutions.
  • Engagement – Hackathons build team and community spirit. Participants have fun, and they get a chance to collaborate with others with whom they don’t typically work with on a daily basis.
  • Diversity – Having a wide range of participants generates a variety of fresh perspectives, both on existing problems and for future possibilities.

The result? An event filled with fun, high-energy, free food, great ideas, engaging presentations and amazingly talented people. There are a number of concepts that we are very excited about and could make its way into future editions of our products.

So, if you have a revolutionary idea that you’d like to see become part of our product—or even just an evolutionary step that fixes a chronic problem—let us know about it. It may be the perfect candidate for our next hackathon. The truth is, we all want to change the world of healthcare, and we’d love to explore and define that future together with you!

 

 

 

The Importance of Flexible Technology in High-Performance Practices

Adam Curran

Adam Curran

Product Marketing Manager at SRS Health
Adam Curran is a Product Marketing Manager at SRS. He oversees marketing intelligence to support the development of strategic marketing plans. Prior to joining the organization, he was a key member of a pharmaceutical software company’s Clinical Development Business Unit, specializing in the clinical data management elements of the drug development lifecycle. He was also the editor for their microsite’s blog. Adam has also held roles at the UK’s National Energy Foundation and Skills Funding Agency.
Adam Curran

flexible-tech-blogAn article posted recently to LinkedIn—about the jobs most and least likely to fall victim to robot replacements—started me thinking about the place of technology in healthcare. One takeaway from the article is that automation is best deployed for tasks that are manually or cognitively repetitive, freeing humans to specialize in tasks that are non-repetitive and non-predictable, ones the writer describes as requiring “human intuition, reasoning, empathy and emotion.”[1]

That was exactly the promise of electronic health record (EHR) technology—routine bureaucratic tasks would be automated, freeing doctors and staff to do what they do best: treat patients. Yet in a recent study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, ambulatory physicians spent an average of a full hour at the computer for every hour they spent face to face with patients.[2] Imagine automating a factory and discovering that workers now worked twice as long, or produced half as much, because of the time required by the new technology that was supposed to reduce their workload.

Paradoxically, with recent advances in technology, it is now more possible than ever for EHRs to fulfill their original promise—and more; the problem is that most of the EHRs being offered to medical practices are simply the wrong technology. In an attempt to meet standardized government regulations, vendors have created standardized EHRs—gigantic, one-size-fits-all behemoths that attempt to meet the needs of all physicians, but end up missing the mark with nearly everyone. Particularly when it comes to specialists. KLAS’ Ambulatory Specialty 2016—One Size Does Not Fit All—Performance Report found that although traditional EHR vendors try to cover all specialties, fields like ophthalmology, orthopedics, and dermatology still lack the functionality required.[3]

This is why one size definitely does not fit all. The right EHR solution for a hospital or general practitioner, seeing a limited number of patents with a wide variety of conditions, will look quite different from the EHR for specialists who see a high volume of patents with similar complaints. And of course, different specialties won’t want exactly the same EHR, either, making flexibility—rather than universal applicability—a major prerequisite.

No wonder that 86% of specialists, according to Black Book Market Research, agree that the single biggest trend in technology replacements these days is the move to specialty-driven EHRs because of the workflow and productivity complications that accompany conventional, template-driven EHRs.[4]

Unfortunately, the problems with inflexible, template-driven EHRs don’t end with the lack of specialty-specific solutions. A secondary, but still significant, concern is the inability of many EHRs to be tailored to the need of individual physicians within the practice. One doctor may prefer taking notes, another inputs her own data, while a third dictates; one may be comfortable communicating through a patent portal, another prefers the phone. True flexibility means that no provider has to change the way that he or she has been practicing medicine simply to satisfy the demands of a generic template.

It also means that, when it comes to increasingly crucial matter of data collection, the decision about how data should be collected—what should be collected electronically and which should remain manual—is left up to the individual practice. In the next blog, I will look at what is called “role-based data entry,” and how this can increase productivity and cut costs.


 

[1] https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/5-jobs-robots-take-first-shelly-palmer

[2] http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2546704

[3] Ambulatory Specialty 2016—One Size Does Not Fit All—Performance Report. KLAS. April 2016.

[4] https://blackbookmarketresearch.newswire.com/news/specialty-driven-ehrs-make-a-comeback-reveals-2016-black-book-11534546

A New Data Has Dawned

Scott Ciccarelli

Scott Ciccarelli

CEO at SRS Health
Scott Ciccarelli, Chief Executive Officer at SRS, has more than 20 years of diverse management and operations experience garnered as a senior executive at GE, where he headed two of the company’s businesses—most recently, GE Healthcare’s Services, Ambulatory and Revenue Cycle Solutions. His areas of expertise include business strategy, leadership development, operational rigor (Lean Six Sigma), and the delivery of enhanced value for customers through quality improvement and innovation.
Scott Ciccarelli

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new-srs-blog-v2As we all prepare for another year of change in the healthcare industry, it is my privilege to share a big change of our own: SRSsoft is now SRS Health!

Why would we change our name, our logo, and our tagline? And what does this mean to our clients?

During our 20 years of innovation, the healthcare technology field has been radically transformed. So has SRS. What began as a document management company is now something completely different. We have reinvented SRS as a data solutions company that can help drive better care and better outcomes for our clients today…and in the future. That’s more than an evolution; it’s a revolutionary change worthy of rebranding.

Our Name                                                                                                                         Why did we add “health” to our name? The new moniker comes from our expertise at supporting your expertise: patient health and practice health. Our flexible data platform and integrated best-of-breed approach allows specialists to utilize HCIT in a way that improves the experience for their patients and their practice.

Our Logo                                                                                                                         The orb shape of the logo represents the continuum of engaging patients before, during, and after their visits. It represents the perfect balance of improved efficiency with proven outcomes.  And it represents the unending dedication of our team to remain in motion as we continue to pioneer the HCIT solutions of the future. The fiery color of our logo represents the passion and commitment of our people to ensure client satisfaction.

Our Tagline                                                                                                                             “Intelligent Data Solutions.” For specialists, these three words simply haven’t gone together in a way that provided the types of benefits that SRS Health offers. That’s because the EHR marketplace caters to generalists. Finally, these focused practices can escape the data dark ages with HCIT solutions that are predictive, connective, and exactly what the (specialist) doctor ordered.

To find out more about what’s behind the new SRS Health, I invite you to watch our new video. I think you’ll agree that it really is the dawning of a new data!

Wishing you SRS Health and happiness in the New Year,

Scott

The Year’s Innovations – Wrap-up & What’s to Come!

Khal Rai

Khal Rai

CEO at SRS Health
Khal Rai brings over 20 years of leadership experience to his role as President and CEO at SRS. He possesses a breadth of knowledge and expertise in the healthcare and technology sectors earned through a career that has spanned the globe. His passion for collaboration, strategic development, and delivering healthcare IT solutions that make it easier for medical professionals to deliver care while navigating the ever-changing healthcare industry, inspires and motivates his team, while positioning SRS Health clients for current and future success. Khal has a B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University.
Khal Rai

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2017-lightbulbsDepending on your point of view, 2016 was either a year to remember, or one to forget—just look at the nominations for word of the year. Pundits have proposed everything from “surreal” (Merriam-Webster’s) to “post-truth” (Oxford Dictionaries) to “unhinged” (NPR’s books editor Petra Mayer). Which is just to say, it was a year when conventional expectations were overthrown. And 2017 promises to be just as full of surprises.

For all the uncertainty, though, some trends seem sure to continue, at least in healthcare. The movement toward value-based payment is unlikely to reverse itself, which means that the optimum long-term strategy for medical practices remains the same as last year—cut costs by increasing efficiency, maximize patient base by identifying and standardizing successful treatment approaches, and stay limber by not getting locked into a cumbersome, inflexible software system.

Over the years, we have worked closely with our clients to learn what they needed from us, and to gain the sort of specialty-specific expertise that ensures that our solutions are designed around our clients’ workflows, rather expecting them to tailor their workflows to our design.

This past year, however, has been particularly transformative. We have made a quantum leap forward by upgrading our EHR into something far more—an intelligent, data-focused solution that responds to today’s industry challenges and lays a solid but flexible groundwork for the future. It’s a unique, best-of-breed, specialty-focused approach that gives users the power to define and collect whatever data points are relevant to their success while still maintaining their preferred clinical workflow options.

What we have achieved so far – 2016 recap

We entered last year determined to expand our physician-centric approach to include all stakeholders in the outpatient healthcare delivery system. Because we put our clients’ requirements first, we had to take a fresh look at what their needs actually were in this changing landscape. The biggest need? Tools to capture the data they wanted, but only that data, without anything unnecessary that would distract from their primary focus. (Click here to read my other post about how we do data differently.) We realized that, to meet those needs, we had to transform our offering into more than just an EHR.

We achieved this by creating a  connected software system that lets practices distribute the data-collection process over the entire treatment encounter—before, during, and after the patient visit—in whatever way is most efficient and sensible for them. Here is what we have delivered:

  • Flexible Data Platform (FDP) – Discrete data collection and reporting, free from a forced template-based environment.
  • Smart Workflows (SWF) – Guided workflow to help practices optimize their daily schedules by letting them determine who does what best, where and when.
  • Patient engagement platform – A patient-portal solution that seamlessly engages the patient pre-visit. Success is measured by higher patient compliance, lower check-in costs to practices, and greater patient engagement in their own health post-patient visit.
  • Interoperability – An Application Program Interface (API) that allows for efficient data exchange between systems, and that gives practices the flexibility to choose the best solution to any given problem (e.g., clinical, financial) without sacrificing cost and/or productivity.

What’s next? – Even more data!

We have already laid the foundation for what is required today and tomorrow. The next step is to ensure that we maximize the value of what we offer by providing the following additions to fulfill our vision:

  • Regulatory compliance – Prepare clients to understand, comply, and succeed while retaining productivity and efficiency focus (e.g., MU / MIPS, AMC, PQRS reporting).
  • Outcomes – Invest in solutions and technologies to help practices drive, improve, and document clinical outcomes to improve patient care and increase reimbursements
  • Data and AI – Continue to optimize SRS’s recently released SWF and FDP solutions to leverage data and artificial intelligence to optimize clinical workflows.

We understand that no two practices are alike—they all have different rates and style of data collection. One practice may need to automate everything immediately, while another may only automate elements that will drive down costs, and decide to keep other processes manual. Our solution is designed with this level of flexibility in mind—to satisfy each practice’s requirements for today while having the functionality to support their evolving needs in the future.

Wrapping it up

The underlying SRS strategy is a physician-centric approach we call “practical innovation.” We are more than just a solutions vendor . . . we focus on finding a solution to the specific challenges facing specialists. We partner with practices to solve their actual business problems—we help them stay independent, drive revenue growth, lower costs, stay compliant with regulations, and demonstrate clinical quality.

If you’re looking for a partner who will really listen to you and understand your needs, who will help engage your patients and produce better clinical outcomes, who will keep your practice competitive in a changing environment, then SRS is your partner of choice—for today, and for whatever unpredictable tomorrow awaits us down the road.

What Are Specialists Faced With Today? Uncertainty and Change!

Ryan Newsome

Ryan Newsome

Vice President of Product Development at SRS Health
Ryan Newsome is the Vice President of Product Development. In this role he is responsible for the Product Development, Engineering, Quality, Development Operations, and Program Management teams.

Ryan began his career as a Software Engineer for Pitney Bowes/Map Info building early location-aware web services and solutions. Since joining the SRS Health team in 2005, Ryan has held multiple engineering, architecture and management roles in the Product Development organization. Over his 12-year tenure with SRS, Ryan has helped lead the Development organization through a number of growth cycles and evolutions, most recently being the organization’s transition to Agile development. He is passionate about building strategies and solutions that have a big impact on the lives of the specialists we serve, as well as their patients, and believes this is achieved through a commitment to collaboration among clients, strategic partners, and the SRS team. He regularly attends industry trade shows, conferences, and commercial engagements where he represents the company’s product vision and strategy. Ryan received a Bachelor of Science in Computer Sciences from Sienna College.
Ryan Newsome

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Changes AheadRecent Nobel-recipient Bob Dylan wrote “The Times They Are A-Changin’” in 1963—a time of growing social upheaval reflected in the song’s lyrics, which called for listeners to acknowledge and embrace the transformations taking place around them. As I listened to this song over the past weekend, I couldn’t help but draw a correlation to the radical transformations we are currently experiencing in our industry. The past several years have epitomized the term “change” as the nation has taken big steps to transform the delivery of healthcare.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, signed in 2009 by President Barack Obama, was one of the catalysts for this transformation by requiring the “meaningful use” of digital systems in healthcare. Since then, change has been the only constant that we have been able to count on. Government regulations, payment models, and product innovations have continued to evolve in disruptive ways—both good and bad. As soon as we become comfortable with one wave of change, another wave is already threatening to drench us to the bone (for us, the next big one is MACRA & MIPS).

So, coming off nearly a decade of constant uncertainty, what’s next? Well, you guessed it—more change! Starting in 2017 we will have new policy leaders in place who have promised to significantly restructure the incumbent’s healthcare programs. President-elect Donald Trump’s appointment of Tom Price as the head of HHS may be indicative of the changes on the horizon. Price, a 6-term congressman from the Atlanta, Georgia, area, was formerly an orthopedic surgeon. Will a specialist at the helm help make government programs, that have typically been focused on primary and in-patient care, more meaningful for specialists?

Time will tell, but the one thing that is certain is that, as the song says, the wheel is still in spin. In other words, the times they are still a-changin’.

The Hills Are Alive…With the Sound of a New SRS!

Scott Ciccarelli

Scott Ciccarelli

CEO at SRS Health
Scott Ciccarelli, Chief Executive Officer at SRS, has more than 20 years of diverse management and operations experience garnered as a senior executive at GE, where he headed two of the company’s businesses—most recently, GE Healthcare’s Services, Ambulatory and Revenue Cycle Solutions. His areas of expertise include business strategy, leadership development, operational rigor (Lean Six Sigma), and the delivery of enhanced value for customers through quality improvement and innovation.
Scott Ciccarelli

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mountain-blogI love that our annual event is called the SRS User Summit – because this year, the news was so good that I wanted to shout it from the top of the tallest mountain! (Or, maybe sing it, but I’m no von Trapp family member…) Every member of the SRS team felt the same way. Thankfully, after hearing our big news, so did the clients who attended.

Here’s the shout-worthy news: SRS has completely transformed into an intelligent data-focused solutions provider. Our days of being a document management company are behind us. And rather than tweaking existing template-based systems as many of our competitors have chosen to do, we pioneered a specialist-oriented solution that simply doesn’t exist elsewhere. We have invented a new approach to data that is totally revolutionary – balancing speed, efficiency, data collection and sharing.

Why? Demands on medical practices have become even steeper, and the main path followed by other HCIT vendors won’t help specialists reach their goals. That’s why SRS is carving out new trails in order to provide the level of partnership that is needed today and tomorrow. Together, we will achieve:

  • Better patient engagement
  • Better clinical outcomes
  • Better operational efficiency

I know that’s a lot to claim. That’s exactly why I was so excited to unveil the new SRS at the User Summit: because as someone with a high say/do ratio, I’m thrilled to say that we can back up every claim we are making! Here are a few examples of what’s available now, and what is coming soon:

TODAY

  • Patient Engagement Platform– streamline the registration process by enhancing the digital intake experience and reduce appointment “no shows” with automated reminders. Influence patient behavior through meaningful engagement in both pre and post visit by customizing patient forms to practice requirements, and leveraging patients to complete forms online before their appointment.
  • Smart Workflows –our revolutionary patent pending Smart Workflows allow you to collect more data and quickly document patient encounters with customizable workflows, provide standardized care efficiently through protocols, drive compliance with regulatory and quality improvement initiatives, and demonstrate the value of your services through analytics and outcomes.
  • Data Interoperability – capture then share discrete clinical data with other information systems across all parts of the healthcare network through the use of our APIs.

TOMORROW

  • Flexible Data Platform –capture the data you want, when you want, and how you want with our data capture platform. It empowers users to drill down and capture and report on any discrete data point that is truly relevant to them.
  • Integrated Best of Breed – enjoy the seamless user experience of our tightly integrated healthcare IT ecosystem—including EHR, Practice Management, Patient Portal, and Transcription—each selected for their ability to serve high-performance specialists and to easily integrate with your practice’s other HCIT solutions.
  • Patient Population – improve patient outcomes through tailored outreach campaigns that educate them post encounter, as well as setting up reminders and sending out surveys to collect more relevant data.

Of course, some things about SRS remain the same – and we promise, they won’t change! For example, we will continue to guide you through regulatory compliance, thanks to our own governmental Sherpa, Lynn Scheps, who has already dug into the 2,398 pages of the new MACRA rule released a week ago.  Plus, the superb client service for which we are known will continue to be core to the SRS experience.

We understand that the future will continue to be an uphill climb. But with SRS by your side, you’ll have the right tools on the right paths. Now that is something to sing about!

Data Done Differently

Khal Rai

Khal Rai

CEO at SRS Health
Khal Rai brings over 20 years of leadership experience to his role as President and CEO at SRS. He possesses a breadth of knowledge and expertise in the healthcare and technology sectors earned through a career that has spanned the globe. His passion for collaboration, strategic development, and delivering healthcare IT solutions that make it easier for medical professionals to deliver care while navigating the ever-changing healthcare industry, inspires and motivates his team, while positioning SRS Health clients for current and future success. Khal has a B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University.
Khal Rai

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data-funnelAs I mentioned in my previous post, The Truth Is Stranger Than Friction, some physicians are so dissatisfied with their EHRs that they wish they could return to the days of paper charts. The main culprit is the data collection process, which causes friction between doctors and patients. I argued that workflows should, first of all, adapt to each doctor’s style so that doctors can concentrate on patients rather than technology, and, second, enable seamless data collection during patient interactions so that doctors don’t waste time recording data later. Traditionally, EHRs have been vendor-led in how they were built rather than being designed around how clients wanted to use them.

The role of an HCIT vendor is to understand its clients’ and prospects’ requirements. This step is often overlooked. We are seeing huge dissatisfaction in practices’ experiences with their current EHR solution. This can be seen with the impact these solutions have on the doctor-patient relationship; many practices have seen a reduction in the amount of face-to-face time with patients, as well as a decrease in the number of patients they can see.

According to a recent Medscape study, 45% of patients made complaints either occasionally or frequently about lack of eye contact, excessive questions, or providers focusing more on the equipment than the exam. On top of that, a recent article on Healthcare Scene reinforces that doctors are frustrated by using EHRs because they don’t match their workflows, feel clunky, and require too much time for documentation. The article goes on to say that these frustrations lead to both physician burnout and a decrease in EHR use.

However, is technology the culprit? No. I believe these problems are not a reflection on the technology. We see in other industries how technology has been optimized to improve business operations and improve customer satisfaction. I would argue that the fundamental problem with EHRs is a lack of understanding of what challenges practices face, and how to accommodate and plan for both today and tomorrow’s needs. This lack of understanding usually results in a poor implementation plan that is set up to fail from day one. Unfortunately, with the move toward a valued-based model, this misunderstanding is likely to cause even more problems.

What is needed is not only a way to capture and share relevant data, but a way to do this without disrupting the physician’s workflow. This is especially important for specialty practices with a high-volume of patients. Workflows should be personalized so they fit around the physician’s way of working rather than interfering with it, and a crucial part of this is cutting out the clutter and showing only relevant information as defined by the physician and practice.

Our team’s philosophy has always been to put the clients’ requirements first in everything we do. We work closely with clients to understand their workflow, and then we provide a solution that improves their operations in a way that makes sense to them. Our years of experience in providing best-of-breed specialty solutions to ambulatory practices has given us a strong appreciation of the importance of designing an agile solution that effectively handles a high-volume patient intake and put through while improving practices’ bottom line.

When it comes to data, we feel just as strongly, if not more so! We want to enable seamless data collection during patient interactions, so that doctors are not spending hours recording data later. We want to empower practices to determine who should capture the data they want, when and how they want, in the context of patient encounter. This means providing a flexible solution that is future-proof, leveraging mobile platforms and predictive technologies, while incorporating Outcomes and Analytics that not only keep up with busy specialists, but actually help move them forward.

That is what we mean by data done differently.