The Essential Elements of Value-based-care Success

Khal Rai

Khal Rai

CEO at SRS Health
Khal Rai brings over 20 years of leadership experience to his role as President and CEO at SRS. He possesses a breadth of knowledge and expertise in the healthcare and technology sectors earned through a career that has spanned the globe. His passion for collaboration, strategic development, and delivering healthcare IT solutions that make it easier for medical professionals to deliver care while navigating the ever-changing healthcare industry, inspires and motivates his team, while positioning SRS Health clients for current and future success. Khal has a B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University.
Khal Rai

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For a medical practice to operate successfully, all its constituent parts need to fit together as seamlessly as the atoms in a molecule—because that’s what it takes to succeed in today’s changing healthcare environment.success-blog-image

In a water molecule, for example, the oxygen atom is balanced and supported by the push and pull of two hydrogen atoms. This simple structure nourishes all life on the planet. But remove one of the atoms and the molecule ceases to exist, breaking down into its component elements of hydrogen and oxygen.

In much the same way, a medical practice is held together by the push and pull of different elemental forces. The doctor is supported by—but also has to balance the demands of—the clinical and financial sides of the practice. When this is done successfully, the result is a caregiving structure that nourishes the health of the patient. If the balance is lost, however, the practice begins to break apart, disrupting the equilibrium between the business of medicine and patient care.

Keeping this already precarious balance has become even more challenging with the shift to value-based medicine, which has altered the healthcare paradigm from doctor says/patient does to doctor/patient collaboration—adding another element to the healthcare molecule—the patient. Now, in addition to keeping up with the latest clinical developments and keeping the practice fiscally afloat, doctors have to find ways to bring the patient into the loop.

This year’s User Summit gave healthcare providers a forum for discussing what it takes to succeed in the evolving, value-based healthcare environment, and it gave us a chance to showcase the innovations we have developed to help you keep the right balance between the elements.

So how do we involve patients more deeply in the healthcare process? How do we make sure that they are informed and engaged with their care team, that they understand and comply with their care plan, and that they are financially supported in maintaining care?

For us at SRS Health, the challenge is to develop solutions that reduce the barriers between the patient and the practice. This means providing practices with tools that:

  • offer both speed and flexibility,
  • improve both the clinical and patient experience,
  • remove physician and clinical team distractions while still providing true mobility,
  • streamline the efficient collection of relevant data and corresponding intelligence at the point of care, and
  • address the healthcare consumer’s role in driving patient satisfaction and practice financial health.

In other words, finding practical innovations that support all of the elements of healthcare in achieving success.

How Your Practice Should Compete in the Digital World

As technology has changed the way people receive information, it has also changed the way patients determine a care path for an injury or condition. Most significantly though, it has changed the way patients choose a specialist to treat their condition.  Practices must adapt their patient acquisition strategies to reflect this more informed and more digitally savvy audience if they want to remain profitable in the coming years.

This is especially true for practices that wish to remain independent as hospitals and health systems continue to acquire referring practices, such as Primary Care and Family Medicine.  However, too often practices do not understand the need to implement a cohesive digital strategy until they begin to see a decline in patient volume or an increase in competition.  It is important to understand the impact the digital shift has had on patients and how to use it to remain profitable.  Below are some of the basic strategies practices should be using:

A Mobile Responsive and Unique Website 

Statistically, almost 70% of medical journeys begin online with patients searching for conditions and a provider to treat that condition.  What’s more, 60% of all internet traffic now comes from a mobile device (phone, tablet, etc.).  What this means is that the majority of potential patients are researching a condition or searching for a provider on a smartphone or tablet. This is where your practice’s website becomes one of the most important tools in patient acquisition.

By now most practices have a website – but that may not be enough.  In 2014, Google began to penalize websites that did not meet the standards of a “mobile responsive” website.  What this means is that the website had to be updated to use a theme or platform that automatically detected whether the potential patient was using a phone, tablet or desktop computer and automatically reformatted the layout and navigation of the website to ensure a better user experience.  If your website does not meet these criteria, Google began to push your website further down in the results if a search came from a phone or tablet.  If patients have to spend time pinching and scrolling to be able to read the content on your site, they are far more likely to leave your website and go to a competitors’ website to find the information they are looking for.

In addition to the mobile responsiveness of your site, Google bases your placement in search results based on the content within your site.  Too often practices make the mistake of simply listing the conditions they treat or procedures that they perform.  Not only does this lack of content hurt your placement is Google search results, but it also hurts your new patient acquisition.

In a world where a wealth of information on any medical condition is accessible instantaneously, the modern patient needs more than just a bullet point on your website to ensure that you are the right doctor for them.  To increase patient acquisition, your website should have individual pages for each treatment you provide, condition you treat and procedures you perform.

A Google Pay Per Click (Adwords) Strategy

A Google Adwords Strategy gives your practice the ability to target your message to patients in your area looking for your services at that very moment.  Google Adwords allows your practice to “bid” on relevant search terms in your area and shows your results at the top of the page. Google Adwords is statistically the highest ROI digital marketing effort a practice can utilize.

The most important aspect of Google Adwords to remember is that these ads allow you to outrank your competitors for only the most relevant searches and keywords related to the services of your practice for those searching in your area.  Also, these ads are shown above the organic search results, so even if a competitor’s website outranks yours, your ad can be shown above their website.  

But, running a Google Adwords strategy on your own may be more complex than it seems and can result in wasting a large amount of dollars if not implemented and monitored correctly.  Knowing what kinds of phrases indicate a patient is simply doing research versus those terms that a patient is specifically looking for a physician can be the difference of hundreds or thousands of dollars in a month.

Social Media Marketing

According to a 2017 Pew Research Study, 67% of all Americans get at least half their news from Social Media sites.  This represents a significant shift from print and TV being the primary news sources, but does not seem all too surprising considering that the average American spends almost two hours per day on social media sites.

The likely reason for these shifts is that social media sites like Facebook serve as aggregate news sites where users can get information from all their trusted news sources, from local newspapers to national TV networks, in one single place.  Platforms like Facebook recognized very early on how to monetize the time users spent on the site or app by allowing for highly targeted advertisement being shown to their over 1 billion users.

In most cases, medical practices conceptualize social media as a place where people post pictures of their children, pets and food.  While that may be what you see externally, internally Facebook and Instagram have an incredible amount of data about their users that can be used to target specific ads to potential patients in your area.  These platforms track data points that include your age, gender, location, purchases you make, websites you have visited, interests you have and thousands of other data points.  All of this data can be used to create a behavior profile of a patient that may be in need of your services and target them with ads both on social media and on other websites they visit.

Facebook and Instagram ads are imperative for brand awareness and have become the modern newspaper or magazine ads and are far more cost effective.

What digital healthcare marketing strategies are your practice implementing to help build brand awareness with your patients?

 

daniel-goldberg

About the Author 

Daniel Goldberg is the CEO of Gold Medical Marketing and has been a thought leader for almost a decade in the field of Healthcare Marketing. Daniel has also lectured at some of the most esteemed medical conferences in the country and has contributed to many healthcare industry publications on the topics of Medical Marketing and Direct to Patient Marketing.  Daniel and his team at Gold Medical Marketing have helped practices around the country implement unique marketing strategies based on their specialty and unique patient demographics.

Are You Preparing for Appropriate Use Criteria Compliance?

Barbara Mullarky

Barbara Mullarky

Director, Product Management at SRS Health
Barbara has had a successful career in the healthcare industry, working for both vendors and healthcare provider organizations. She has held roles in sales, marketing, product management and professional services, working with EMR and department-focused solutions for the laboratory and imaging.

Prior to becoming the Director of Product Management at SRS, Barbara was with GE Healthcare (now GE Digital), where she held the positions of Senior Product Marketing Manager for Centricity imaging products, Product Marketing Manager and Customer Collaboration Leader for what is now Caradigm, and Upstream Marketing Manager for Centricity Laboratory. Barbara also worked at the University of Arizona Medical Center, where she managed a team that was responsible for implementing and maintaining 27 departmental IT solutions, the ambulatory EMR and the patient safety initiatives.

Originally from New Jersey, Barbara now lives with her husband in Tucson, AZ. She is a graduate of the West Virginia University College of Medicine and is a registered Medical Technologist. When not at work, she loves traveling, taking photographs, watching football and spending time with her two Brittanys.
Barbara Mullarky

auc-blogAppropriate Use Criteria (AUC) is a lesser-known government law that will affect everyone who orders advanced imaging procedures—a staple of orthopaedic practices. AUC is part of the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule regulations.

The law will impact the ordering, performing, and payment for advanced imaging procedures beginning January 1, 2020. The initial year (2020) will be an educational and testing year that will not affect payment.

Included in the advanced imaging procedure category are MRI, CT, PET, and nuclear studies. While certain specialties may not order many PET or nuclear studies, MRI and CT are staples in the diagnostic pathway and help determine care.

How does the law work?

The government is mandating that before any advanced imaging procedure is ordered, the ordering provider must consult an approved Clinical Decision Support Mechanism (CDSM). The CDSM will consider multiple factors on the patient and provide a recommendation as to whether or not the ordered procedure is appropriate or whether an alternative would be better.

At this point, providers have the choice to continue with the original order or to follow the CDSM recommendations. Information provided in the CDSM recommendation must be provided to the furnishing provider (imaging facility). The imaging facility must then include this information on the claim to the payer, and data on the choices made by the ordering provider will be stored in the CDSM for future auditing purposes.

Those who do their own in-house imaging will be impacted on the ordering and furnishing side. Your EHR, Radiology Information System (RIS), and claims management system will all need to be updated with new software to manage this.

We encourage you to speak with your EHR vendor to make the process of remaining compliant and meeting the requirements as seamless and minimally invasive as possible.

Hackathon IV: Notes 2.0 and Beyond… A New Evolution Has Begun

Vishu Viswanathan

Vishu Viswanathan

Director of Software Engineering at SRS Health
Vishu started his career with SRS Health as the Director of Program Management, and is now the Director of Software Engineering. In this role, he is responsible for the architecture, design, and development operations for the SRS product lines.

Prior to joining SRS in 2017, Vishu was with GE Healthcare, where he was the SW Engineering Director for the Centricity Imaging PACS product. Vishu has had a successful career in the healthcare industry, with deep domain expertise in Healthcare imaging, devices and information technology, and medical software development. He began his career as a Software Engineer with GE Healthcare and has held progressively responsible roles in both product development and program management.

Vishu is an Agile practitioner and is passionate about people and product development. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science and Engineering, and Masters in Business Administration.
Vishu Viswanathan

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Hackathon 1Last month, SRS Health participated in an energizing, collaborative and fun-filled Hackathon IV, a company-wide event designed to stimulate the innovative mind-set and competitive spirit of the organization to explore creative solutions for client needs.

The theme for the 4th Annual Hackathon Event was, Notes 2.0 and Beyond. Technological advancements in the healthcare space has enabled the use of various mobile devices and technologies at the point-of-care. The team was challenged to come up with ideas that revolutionize the process of capturing and documenting patient encounters, while maintaining/improving accuracy, high productivity, and efficiency for the end user.

Scores of ideas were submitted from across the organization and narrowed down to six ideas that our hackathon teams focused on. At the end of the event, the organization held a traditional “science fair” to showcase the incredibly innovative solutions developed over the one-week event.

We are excited that a number of these concepts have the potential to make it into future versions of our products. We look forward to sharing them with our clients in the 2018 User Summit’s Innovation Expo in October in Las Vegas.

At SRS Health, we strive to bring innovative healthcare IT solutions to the marketplace and our hackathon events allow the team to innovate without restraints.

Hackathon 2

Spring at SRS Brings New Growth

Khal Rai

Khal Rai

CEO at SRS Health
Khal Rai brings over 20 years of leadership experience to his role as President and CEO at SRS. He possesses a breadth of knowledge and expertise in the healthcare and technology sectors earned through a career that has spanned the globe. His passion for collaboration, strategic development, and delivering healthcare IT solutions that make it easier for medical professionals to deliver care while navigating the ever-changing healthcare industry, inspires and motivates his team, while positioning SRS Health clients for current and future success. Khal has a B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University.
Khal Rai

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ceo-spring-blogThree months have passed since I took over the reins at SRS Health, and what I have enjoyed most over that time is sharing in our clients’ successes, as well as learning about the challenges they face, their experiences, and their visions for the future. So far this year, I have had the pleasure of speaking with many of them on the phone and off traveling around the country to meet others in their practices or at conferences like ADAM, AAOS, AAOE, The OrthoForum, and HIMSS.

One recurring theme that has been a part of every conversation is the need to embrace change—to look forward, to anticipate, and to strive for improvement. Our mission is to help our clients do just that. We are excited to share the innovations SRS has been working on to help our clients excel at the practice and the business of medicine. Here are a few examples:

SRS Health launches the first end-to-end integrated clinical and financial solution suite for high-performance enterprise practices

I am pleased to announce that SRS recently debuted a unique and powerful new addition to our end-to-end software suite that leverages both clinical and financial expertise. What makes this solution unique is the integration that addresses true episodic care. SRS’ roots in the orthopaedic market combined with the new financial management capabilities offers a seamless set of tools for enhancing workflows, adapting to regulatory changes, adopting risk-based models, managing the increase in patient economic responsibility, and expanding programs in the employer market.

The Opioid Crisis and Drug Monitoring

As you know, the opioid crisis has become a top-of-mind political, social, and policy challenge. SRS has committed to joining the fight by being the first specialty EHR to offer PDMP (Prescription Drug Monitoring Program) checking and documentation integrated within the prescribing workflow—delivering a 67% time savings over current methods. More than 40 states already have PDMP mandates and it won’t be long before they all do. This is a great step in keeping our clients ahead of the curve.

Improving Our Clients’ Experience

While working on innovation, we haven’t forgotten about our clients’ day-to-day experience. To ensure their success, we have been formalizing the structure of the SRS Client Success Program. This year we’ve launched the Client Success Training Program and the Features Improvement Team. In addition, we have increased our clients’ ability to integrate with registries, HIEs, and more. These programs ensure that they have the knowledge and skills to fully leverage their HCIT solutions, the facility to share knowledge across their organization, and the connections to exchange information with optimal efficiency.

Medicine continues to put more and more demands on physicians, clinicians, and other healthcare professionals, and we’re excited that our integrated solutions suite optimizes performance and care before, during, and after the patient encounter. Our goal is to help our clients by taking care of the business of medicine, so they can focus on what matters most—their patients.

Why an EHR Solution Is a Must-Have for 2018

Diane Beatini

Diane Beatini

Vice President, Sales at SRS Health
Diane Beatini is the Vice President of Sales. She oversees the Sales, Account Management, and Sales Operations teams. She works to promote the complete SRS product suite of HCIT solutions to medical practices of varied sizes and specialties. Diane’s background includes an MBA in marketing and finance with 15 years of executive sales and customer service management experience in the radiology, medical device, and pharmaceutical industries.
Diane Beatini

Looking back at 2017 as we head into 2018, the resounding theme in healthcare has been the push to bring down costs and drive up quality by increasing efficiency and improving care coordination. As the healthcare landscape shifts and evolves with groundbreaking alliances such as the proposed CVS Health/Aetna partnership, it is interesting to note that the percentage of office-based physicians using an EMR/EHR solution is a significant 86.9%, with only a small percentage of medical practices still using traditional paper charts. (Health IT Dashboard)

Reasons cited by physicians for remaining on paper include failed implementations, fear of a loss in productivity, and security concerns. While these are valid concerns, practicing medicine using traditional paper charts is becoming increasingly difficult as the industry moves to a value-based payment model, with more emphasis placed on patient engagement, interoperability, and shared patient data.

Typically, physicians spend 30–40 hours per week interacting with their patients. In a paper-based office, each patient visit results in approximately 10–13 pieces of paperwork, detracting from the time spent on patient care. (Benefits of Modern EMR vs. Paper Medical Records) Even if the physicians themselves do not handle the paper, their staff must, and a paper-driven staff results in an unproductive office. Since paper charts can only be in one location, clinical and administrative staff spend valuable time locating and providing charts. When there are multiple office locations, the additional chart transport compounds the problem and the practice becomes even more unproductive. Most practice administrators estimate the cost of a chart pull at $5.00 in lost productivity. Multiplied across hundreds and thousands of active charts, the numbers become staggering.

To remain competitive in the ever-changing healthcare environment and to attract patients and physician recruits, an EHR solution is a must-have for 2018 and beyond. As the penalties increase and reimbursements decline year by year, EHRs play a critical role in helping to preserve and drive revenue and reduce costs. Significant benefits of adopting an EHR include:

  • Reduced Administrative Burden An EHR can eliminate redundancies in documentation, provide fast and accurate record transmission, and drive efficiencies throughout the clinic, inclusive of patient intake. This can be accomplished while mimicking the traditional paper chart, which allows for an easy transition from paper to an electronic system.
  • Heightened Cost Efficiencies – An EHR can drive productivity, saving physicians and clinical staff valuable time and reducing the need and/or cost of transcription services, chart rooms, and record clerks. Regulatory resources through a reputable HCIT partner can assist the practice in penalty avoidance and meeting the requirements for MACRA/MIPS.
  • Patient Referrals/Community Presence – A 2006 Harris Interactive Poll reported 55% of adults believed that the use of EHRs would reduce the number of medical errors, and 60% believed the use of EHRs would lower their healthcare costs. (Benefits of Modern EMR vs. Paper Medical Records). Since that time, patients have come to expect electronic access and communication with their providers through the use of a patient portal. In addition to medical records access, secured messaging, and appointment and refill requests, an integrated patient portal embedded in the EHR allows patient-entered information and demographics to automatically populate the chart and the note, saving critical time and expense.
  • Patient Safety – EHRs improve patient safety by providing an organized, all-inclusive electronic chart that houses reminders, messages, and alerts in addition to exam notes, diagnostic images, and medical, medication, and allergy history. Each chart is readily accessible from any office location as well as remotely so providers have the complete information when responding to messages from inside or outside the office.

So why do some practices continue to hold out? The most common reason cited for not making the transition is the inability to obtain a physician consensus—there are differing opinions as to the best EHR, and even as to the best approach, including how much or little interaction they want with the solution, and the degree of elimination of paper from the practice.

Successful adoption of a solution, therefore, can be ensured by working with a vendor who can tailor the implementation to the needs of the practice and its providers, addressing individual physician workflow preferences and providing flexibility and ease of use. Further, practices can ensure that the solution will support their preferred clinical workflows by choosing an established and recognized EHR partner with proven experience in their medical specialty. The right partner will also be able to provide testimonials and client references documenting its ability to implement, train, and transition practices from paper charts without any impact on either patient volume or productivity. Is your practice still on paper and if so, what’s holding you back?

I Want My…I Want My VBC

Scott Ciccarelli

Scott Ciccarelli

CEO at SRS Health
Scott Ciccarelli, Chief Executive Officer at SRS, has more than 20 years of diverse management and operations experience garnered as a senior executive at GE, where he headed two of the company’s businesses—most recently, GE Healthcare’s Services, Ambulatory and Revenue Cycle Solutions. His areas of expertise include business strategy, leadership development, operational rigor (Lean Six Sigma), and the delivery of enhanced value for customers through quality improvement and innovation.
Scott Ciccarelli

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I-want-my-vbc-blog

Launched with the iconic “I Want My MTV” ad campaign, Music Television was born in 1981 – and the music industry changed forever. For the first time, we could do more than hear music; we could see it being executed in a new visual medium. And the most successful bands were the ones who took advantage of this new opportunity to engage with audiences. Fast-forward to today, and technology has helped our music consumption continue to evolve in ways we could never have imagined.

So why am I talking about the 80s, what does this have to do with our annual User Summit, and how does Value Based Care (VBC) fit into all of this? Yes, we had an awesome 80s-themed party at last month’s summit. (I may or may not have been dressed as Slash, the guitarist from Guns N’ Roses at one point…) But there’s a better reason: we are in the midst of a healthcare revolution – and we are all making history. Together.

“Together” is a key word to tomorrow’s value based success. It’s how SRS Health is going to help our clients prepare for VBC, so they can benefit financially from the data-driven rewards – and more importantly, so they can utilize that data to provide even better medical care. We are continuing the SRS tradition of collaborating with our clients to create agile solutions designed to maximize today’s opportunities and pave the way for value-based success.

How are we doing this? With intelligent data solutions that cultivate the high levels of patient engagement, operational efficiency, and demonstration of quality that are critical to VBC. Working toward improved outcomes benefits your patients, and it benefits your businesses.

Here’s how some of our amazing clients are adding their ingenuity to our flexible data solutions, to provide improved care at lower cost – and create rock star VBC results:

  • Informed Decision Making. Bayview Physicians Group, a multi-specialty practice in Chesapeake, VA, is using data-driven evidence to mitigate the potential reimbursement shortfalls in the Medicare Advantage HCC Program. By developing protocols for various high-risk categories that help justify higher-cost treatments, Bayview is positioning themselves to be ahead of the cost factor curve. Why? Because the data shows that they are only recommending higher-cost treatments when they are medically necessary, which ultimately justifies the expense.
  • Operational Efficiency. Illinois Bone & Joint Institute has been using data to standardize best care practices across all of their physicians to provide the best and most effective results – in both the Medicare Federal Programs and commercial markets. For the past year, they’ve been investigating the factors that most influence orthopaedic outcomes, and how to use outcomes data to drive better care at lower cost. Now they want to combine the power of their EHR and their Outcomes solution to provide real-time evidence-based information at the point of care – and OBERD is on board to help us turn this vision into a real VBC-inspired game changer for them and for the industry.
  • Driving Growth. In South Carolina, Charleston Ear, Nose, and Throat & Allergy is maintaining their competitive edge in a different way. They’re leveraging their center of excellences operational process, IT capabilities and professional organization to expand by offering other practices access to the experience, tools, and solutions required for VBC success. This has led to a group of practices that can negotiate cost savings, better reimbursements and referrals – and it’s helping to create a sort of registry that will provide better data to help inform ENT physicians and improve outcomes in the new healthcare economy.

While VBC may not have the same cache as MTV, it really is something to get excited about. We are on the cusp of an entirely new way of providing healthcare – and with our intelligent data solutions and your innovative medical expertise, we’ve got what it takes to top the charts.

Change is always scary, but it also brings opportunities. And we’re ready to start singing “I want my VBC!” (80s attire optional.)